Members

The international research network on law and anti-social behaviour has members from Australia, Belgium, Canada, Ireland, the Netherlands, Puerto Rico, the United Kingdom and the United States of America.

We welcome new members. Members have to work at a university or a similar academic institute. Membership is free of charge. Please contact the chairman of the network Michel Vols (m.vols@rug.nl) for more information.

——

Executive committee

prof. dr. J.G. Brouwer (University of Groningen, the Netherlands)

Jan Brouwer is professor of Legal Methods and director of the Centre for Public Order, Anti-social behaviour and Security.

Research interests: Public Order Law; Dutch anti-social behaviour law; football hooliganism

Contact: j.g.brouwer@rug.nl

——
M. Vols LLM (University of Groningen, the Netherlands)

Since 2007 Michel works at the University of Groningen as a research assistant of prof. dr. J.G. Brouwer on the field of public order law. Besides that, he was a European Law lecturer. Currently, Michel works at the RUG Centrum voor Openbare Orde en Veiligheid (Centre for Public Order, Anti-social behaviour and Security) as a researcher. His main fields of research are anti-social behaviour law and housing law in the Netherlands, England, Wales and Belgium.

Michel is an editor of the Journal of local government case law and completed several studies about anti-social behaviour law funded by the Dutch Home Office, the Ministry of Justice and the Ministry of Planning.

Michel was a visiting scholar at the University of Ghent (Belgium) and the University of Bristol (UK) and founded the International Research Network on Law and Anti-social behaviour.

Research interests: Housing law; Public Order Law; Dutch anti-social behaviour law; UK anti-social behaviour law; Belgian anti-social behaviour law.

Contact: m.vols@rug.nl

—-

dr. J. Donoghue (University of Oxford, United Kingdom)

Dr Jane Donoghue joined the Centre for Criminology in August 2010. She previously worked as lecturer in law at the School of Law at the University of Reading and is the author of ‘Anti-Social Behaviour Orders: A Culture of Control?’ (Palgrave, 2010). As Principal Investigator, she recently completed an 18 month ESRC funded study of the judicial role in anti-social behaviour cases before the courts in England and Wales. She is currently researching and writing about court specialisation and therapeutic jurisprudence and is also involved in collaborative research on co-production.

Research interests: UK anti-social behaviour law

Selected publications:

– J Donoghue, Anti-Social Behaviour, Community Engagement and the Judicial Role in England and Wales (2011) British Journal of Criminology

-J Donoghue, Truancy and the Prosecution of Parents: An Unfair Burden on Mothers? (2011) 74 Modern Law Review 216

-J Donoghue, The Sociology of law: A rejection of law as socially marginal (2009) 37 International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice 51

-J Donoghue, Antisocial Behaviour Orders in Britain: Contextualizing Risk & Reflexive Modernization (2008) 42 Sociology 337

-J Donoghue, The Judiciary as a Primary Definer on Antisocial Behaviour Orders (2007) 46 Howard Journal of Criminal Justice 417

-J Donoghue, ‘Antisocial Behaviour Orders & Civil Liberties: Striking a Balance?’ (2006) 163 The Prison Service Journal

-J Donoghue, Anti-Social Behaviour Orders: A Culture of Control? (Palgrave Macmillan 2010)

Contact: jane.donoghue@crim.ox.ac.uk

—-

Members (alphabetical order)

dr. R. Atkinson (University of York, United Kingdom)

Rowland took his degree at the University of Kingston between 1990 and 1993 gaining a BSc in Sociology and, following this, his doctorate (on gentrification and displacement in greater London) at the University of Greenwich in 1997. His professional life started as a research fellow at the University of Glasgow in 1997 where he became a lecturer in 2004, shortly before leaving to direct the Housing and Community Research Unit at the University of Tasmania in 2005. He started work at the University of York in 2009.

My work takes social problems as the focus and basis of my empirical, theoretical and applied research. Since my doctoral work on the displacement of households from gentrification in London I have been concerned with the lack of attention on such issues and inequities. My research has endeavoured to connect the choices of affluent and rich households with the traditional foci of much sociological and social geographical work which has tended to emphasise the poor, disorderly and excluded without seeing these issues as part of larger urban, housing and social systems which are themselves deeply divided and unequally structured. A key element of my work has therefore been to integrate high income groups into sociological and public debates about urban disorder, anti-social behaviour and inequalities of access to security and safety.

Today my work is primarily focused on the way that crime and disorder have shaped rich and middle-class life in the city; not least their consumption and relative ‘fortification’ of domestic spaces, and their inclination to seek the domestication of public spaces outside their front doors (often seen in both the control and privatisation of public space). My work with Sarah Blandy (School of Law, University of Leeds) on gated communities and fortress homes continues to question how and why better-off households move into such dwellings, and to challenge thinking around the inevitability or desirability of these patterns.

Research interests: UK anti-social behaviour law.

Selected publications:

  • Atkinson, R. and Flint, J. (2004) Fortress UK? Gated communities, the spatial revolt of the elites and time-space trajectories of segregation, Housing Studies, 19, 6, pp. 875-892.

Download proxy document (PDF  , 185kb)

——

prof. K. Beckett (University of Washington, United States of America)

Katherine Beckett is Professor in the Law, Societies & Justice Program and the Department of Sociology, and Adjunct Professor in the School of Law, at the University of Washington in Seattle. She received her Ph.D. from UCLA’s Department of Sociology and has written extensively about the politics of punishment and social control. She is the author of three books, including Making Crime Pay: Law and Order in Contemporary American Politics (Oxford University Press, 1997) and, most recently, Banished: The New Social Control in Urban America (Oxford University Press 2010). She has also published numerous articles on a range of socio-legal topics such as mass incarceration, monetary sanctions, and racial disparities in drug law enforcement. She is currently studying policy efforts to reduce barriers to work and housing for people with criminal records and to lessen racial disproportionality in the criminal justice system.

Research interests: Social control, law and order, drug law.

Selected publications:

More information and publications:

http://faculty.washington.edu/kbeckett/

Contact: kbeckett@uw.edu

——

dr. K. J. Brown (University of Newcastle, United Kingdom)

Kevin J. Brown joined Newcastle Law School as a lecturer in August 2009. Prior to undertaking this post, he spent four years as an associate lecturer at the University of Manchester. During his career to date, he has also spent time as a full-time researcher on a number of funded projects. He spent a year based in the Criminal Justice Research Unit at the Unveristy of Manchester on an ESF funded project. Prior to this, he worked on two projects for the Scottish Executive during which time he was based at the University of Aberdeen.

Kevin is interested in the use of civil and informal remedies to control criminal and anti-social conduct; regulation through social housing; the rehabilitation of sex offenders; community justice; communitarianism; the regulation of cyber crime; legal education.

Research interests: UK anti-social behaviour law.

Selected publications:

Brown KJ. ‘It Is Not as Easy as ABC’: Examining Practitioners’ Views on Using Behavioural Contracts to Encourage Young People to Accept Responsibility for their Anti-Social Behaviour. The Journal of Criminal Law 2012, 76(1), 53-70.

—-

prof. dr. D. Cowan (University of Bristol, United Kingdom)

Dave Cowan studied law at Southampton, graduating in 1989. He worked as a Research Assistant at the Law Commission (1990-1991), before becoming a Lecturer at Southampton University (1991-1993), Sussex University (1993-1995), and then Bristol University (1995-). He teaches Property Law and his own optional units, Welfare Housing and Complaints and their Redress.

Dave’s research is mostly socio-legal, and focuses on social theory and the housing system(s). His books include Homelessness: The (In)Appropriate Applicant (Dartmouth, 1997), Housing Law and Policy (MacMillan, 1999), as well as co-authored books, The Appeal of Internal Review (Hart, 2003), Regulating Social Housing: Governing Decline(Glasshouse, 2005) and Regulating Renting: Governing the Private Rented Sector (Routledge, 2007).

Dave has conducted and managed research funded by the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister, the Nuffield Foundation, and the Joseph Rowntree Foundation. He was Vice-Chair of the Socio-Legal Studies Association from 2001-2003, and a member of the Civil Justice Council’s Housing and Land Sub-Committee from 2000-2004. He is a member of the editorial boards of the Journal of Law and SocietyPolicy and Politics, and is currently an editor of Social and Legal Studies.

Dave is a Visiting Academic Consultant at the Law Commission, 2005-2007, working on projects concerning housing adjudication and compliance.

Research interests: Housing law; UK anti-social behaviour law.

Selected publications:

– Housing Law and Policy, Cambridge University Press 2012.

—-

dr. E. Devroe (University of Ghent, Belgium; Univeristy of Leiden, the Netherlands)

Elke Devroe (9.10.1963) is social worker (1985), master in criminology (1988) (KULeuven) and doctor in criminology (2012) (VU Amsterdam/University of Ghent, Belgium). She started her scientific career as junior researcher at the department of criminology (KULeuven) in the research project on elaborating a theoretical concept for police statistics. From 1990 till 1998 she continued this project at the Scientific Centre of the division ‘Scientific Police Support’ (Federal Science Program), where she elaborated and produced the Belgian police statistics from 1994 till 1998. From October 1998 till May 2000 she was scientific manager of the Flemish Scientific Research in the unit “Science, Innovation and Media” of the Flemish Government. In 2000 she was senior researcher at the National Institute for Criminalistics & Criminology in Brussels.  Since 2001 she is Managing Director of the division ‘Research & Development & Statistics’ of the Unit of Criminal Science & Policy Of the department Justice, where she develops, conducts and accomplishes research projects about police and public prosecution with a team of junior researchers. From 1999 till 2007 she was assistant professor at the department of criminology of the Free University of Brussels (V.U.B). She lectured the courses ‘criminal politics’ en ‘Criminography’. Since 2005 she is member of the steering committee ‘Campbell Belgium’ and member of the advisory board of the journals ‘Orde van de Dag’ (Kluwer), ‘Criminografische basisinformatie Panopticon’ (Maklu), ‘Veiligheidsbeleid’ (Kluwer) and Brussels Studies. She is author of a range of publications on the link between scientific research and criminal policy and the issue of social disorder and incivilities in the city. In May 2012 she defended her PHD titledA Swelling Culture of Control? The genesis and application of the incivility law in Belgium’ at the VU Amsterdam (published Maklu). Since 2006 she is editor-in-chief of the Journal on Police Studies (Maklu) and member of the advisory board of the European Journal on Police Studies (Maklu). Since 2009 she is member of the research group on ‘social security analyses, department of criminology, university of Ghent.

Research interests: Tackling disorder and anti-social behaviour in different countries, etiological question on incivility, local governance of disorder and crime.

Selected publications:

  • The swelling culture of control?, the genesis and application of the incivility law in Belgium, Maklu, Antwerp, 2012. [Summary]
  • “The policy approach of nuisance problems in public space in Belgium and The Netherlands”, in CACHET, L., e. a. (eds.), Governance of security in the Netherlands and Belgium, Groene Gras, Boom legal publishers, 149-175.
  • BEULLENS, M. en DEVROE, E. (1999), “Het Compstat Project: een ervaring met misdaadanalyse te New York”, Handboek Preventie, Kluwer, maart 1999, 85 p.
  • BEULLENS, M. en DEVROE, E. (1999), “Geweldscriminaliteit”, Handboek Security, Kluwer, afl. 15, 15 maart 1999, 81 p.
  • DEVROE, E., PONSAERS, P., STOOP, R., BEULLENS, M. (1999), “De fetish van de grootstedelijke criminaliteit, over verschillen in geweldspatronen”, Planologisch nieuws, jg.19, nr. 3, 282-291.
  • DEVROE, E. en REYNDERS, D. (2001), “Het veiligheidsprobleem als maatschappelijk proces, naar een geïntegreerd veiligheidsbeleid”, Handboek Politiediensten, Veiligheidsbeleid,Integrale Veiligheid, kadertekst,, Kluwer, afl. 58, 227-264.
  • DEVROE, E. en REYNDERS, D. (2001), “Integrale veiligheidszorg en de ontwikkeling van een criminaliteitsbeleid: een belangrijke rol voor de Dienst Strafrechtelijk Beleid”, Handboek politiediensten, Veiligheidsbeleid, actoren, Kluwer, afl. 58, 317-338.
  • DEVROE, E. (2002), “Evaluatie van preventie: de triangel van beleidsparadoxen”, in: Orde van de Dag, Kluwer, afl. 19, 53-71.
  • DEVROE, E. en SCHEERS, M. (2002), “Spanningen in de publieke ruimte: overlast en verkeerscriminaliteit”, in: DUHAUT, G., PONSAERS, P., PYL, G. en VAN de SOMPEL, R. (eds), Voor verder onderzoek…essays over de politie en haar rol in onze samenleving, Politeia, Brussel, 727-754.
  • DEVROE, E. (2003), “Last van overlast” (red.), Themanummer Orde van de dag, Kluwer, afl. 24.
  • DEVROE, E. (2003), “Overlast: containerbegrip voor onbegrip”in: “Last van overlast”, Orde van de dag, Kluwer, afl. 24, 3-6.
  • DEVROE, E. (2003), “Last van overlast: volle G.A.S. vooruit? in: “Last van overlast”, Orde van de dag, Kluwer, afl. 24, 7-32.
  • DEVROE, E. en KEPPENS, L. (2004), “Evaluatie van zonale veiligheidsplannen: politie en prioriteiten”, Politienieuws, Actuele informatie uit de politiepraktijk, Kluwer, nr. 8, 3.

—–

prof. dr. J. Flint (University of Sheffield, United Kingdom)

I was awarded an MA in Politics from the University of Glasgow in 1994. Whilst continuing my studies at Glasgow, I lectured part-time in HM Prison, Saughton, Edinburgh before gaining an MPhil in Urban Policy in 1998.

I became a part-time Research Associate on the ESRC-funded Edinburgh Study of Youth Transitions and Crime, within the Centre for Law and Society, University of Edinburgh and also joined the Department of Urban Studies, University of Glasgow as a part-time Research Assistant. I continued in both roles until 2000 when I was appointed as a full-time Research Fellow in the Department of Urban Studies and then Lecturer in Housing Studies in 2004.

I moved to Sheffield Hallam University in 2005, where I took up a post as Senior Research Fellow in the Centre for Regional Economic and Social Research.

I became a Principal Research Fellow at Sheffield Hallam in 2006 and was appointed as Professor of Housing and Urban Governance in 2007.

In October 2011 I was appointed to the post of Professor of Town and Regional Planning in the Department of Town and Regional Planning at Sheffield University.

The common theme to all my research has been urban governance, citizenship and social justice. Major threads of this include crime and anti-social behaviour policy, specialist interventions within the most vulnerable households, housing in neighbourhoods policy and evaluation and social cohesion – particularly ethnic and religious identity, social class and culture.

Research interests: UK anti-social behaviour law; Housing policy, housing management, citizenship, crime and anti-social behaviour, neighbourhood renewal and social cohesion and religion.

Selected publications:

– Flint, J.,and Raco,M. (Eds) (2011). The Future of Sustainable Cities: critical reflections. Bristol: Policy Press.
– Flint,J. and Robinson, D. (Eds). (2008). Community Cohesion in Crisis? New dimensions of diversity and difference. Bristol: Policy Press,.
– Flint, J. (2009). Cultures, Ghettos and Camps: Sites of Exception and Antagonism in the City. Housing Studies,24(4), pp.417-431.
– Flint, J (2004) Reconfiguring Agency and Responsibility in Social Housing Governance in Scotland, Urban Studies, 41(1), pp.151-172.

– Flint, J. & Pawson, H. (2009) Social landlords and the regulation of conduct in urban spaces in the UK; Criminology and Criminal Justice Vol: 9(4) pp1–21

Contact: john.flint@sheffield.ac.uk

—–

dr. C. Goldsmith (University of Kingston, United Kingdom)

I graduated in Criminology and Social Policy from the University of Brighton in 2005 and was awarded my PhD entitled ‘It Just Feels Like It’s Always Us’; Young People, Safety and Community, in the summer of 2011. The findings from this research, an ethnographic study of the impact of community safety strategies on young people living in a area of multiple deprivations, are currently being disseminated through publication and conference papers. This work has led to a more general interest in investigating young people’s exposure to criminal and social harms and the informal strategies developed to ameliorate and defend against risk. This raises a number of methodological challenges and I am currently working with colleagues at Kingston University to develop a new qualitative research tool that will provide distinctive insights into how young people experience and negotiate victimisation and social harms. Other work I have been involved in recently includes an Arts and Humanities Research Council scoping study on young people and their connections and disconnections from community. I am also the co-ordinator for the Youth Crime Research Action Group based in the Institute of Social Science at Kingston University.

Publications:

Goldsmith, Carlie (2008) Cameras, cops and contracts: what anti-social behaviour management feels like to young people. In: Squires, Peter, (ed.) ASBO nation: the criminalisation of nuisance. Bristol, U.K. : Policy. pp. 223-237. ISBN 1847420273

See http://fass.kingston.ac.uk/faculty/staff/cv.php?staffnum=613

Contact: carlie.goldsmith@kingston.ac.uk

——

prof. S. Herbert (University of Washington, USA)

My work is focused on the regulation of space, largely through the work of law and of the uniformed police.  All of my projects are deeply qualitative, and use ethnography and interviews to probe the deeper processes and meanings that structure social life.  My interest in law and social control is underscored by my joint appointment in the Law, Societies, and Justice Program , an interdisciplinary undergraduate program whose faculty span the gamut of the social sciences.  Indeed, interdisciplinary inquiry is a cornerstone of my approach to research and teaching.

My previous research examined the spatial tactics of the police and their relations with the community.  My first book, Policing Space: Territoriality and the Los Angeles Police Department (1997, University of Minnesota Press), was based upon extensive ethnographic observations in Los Angeles.  I used that data to explain how the police socially construct and regulate the spaces they patrol.  My second, Citizens, Cops and Power: Recognizing the Limits of Community(2006, University of Chicago Press), examined community policing as practiced in Seattle.  That work stemmed from ethnographic observations of the Seattle Police Department and extensive interviews with Seattle citizens.  My most recent book, Banished: The New Social Control in Urban America, (2009, Oxford University Press) is co-authored with Katherine Beckett.  We use the book to document a range of new social control mechanisms deployed in American cities, all of which ban certain individuals from large swaths of the city.

See http://depts.washington.edu/geog/people/herbert_index.htm

Contact:skherb@u.washington.edu

—–

prof. dr. C. Hunter (University of York, United Kingdom)

My main research interests relate to housing and other urban regeneration issues, and the role of law in implementing and hindering the policy process. In particular I have become a national expert in the responses of housing organisations and local authorities to the issue anti-social behaviour. This research has also extended to the development of similar policies in Australia.

In 2011-12 I am undertaking an ESRC funded project looking at the use of medical evidence in homelessness cases. This is part of a larger project considering the governance of the homeless.

Research interests: Housing law; UK anti-social behaviour law.

Selected publications:

– Carr H and Hunter C. (2010) “YL v Birmingham City Council and others – judgment” in Hunter, R. McGlynn C and Rackely E. Feminist Judgments: from theory to practice Oxford: Hart Publishing

– Flint J. and Hunter C. (2010) “Governing by Civil Order: Towards new frameworks of support, coercion and sanction?” in Smith G., Quirk H and Seddon T. (eds) Regulation and Criminal Justice: developing a New Framework for Research and Policy Development Cambridge: CUP, pp.192-210

– Hunter C. and Nixon J. (2009) ‘Disciplining Women: Anti-Social Behaviour and the Governance of Conduct’ in Millie A. (ed) Securing Respect: Behavioural expectations and anti-social behaviour in the UK Bristol: Policy Press

Cowan D. and Hunter C. (2012) “’Yeah but, no but’ – Pinnock and Powell in the Supreme Court” Modern Law Review 75(1), pp. 78-91

– Carr H. and Hunter C. (2008) ‘Managing vulnerability: homelessness law and the interplay of the social, the political and the technical’ , Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law , 30:4, 293-307

– Hunter C. (2008) ‘Denying the severity of mental health problems to deny rights to the homeless’ People, Place and Policy Online , 2:1 (3)

Research Reports:

Carr H., Cowan D., Hunter C. and Wallace A. (2010) Tenure rights and responsibilities York: Joseph Rowntree Foundationhttp://www.jrf.org.uk/sites/files/jrf/tenure-rights-responsibilities-full.pdf

Pawson H., Sosenko F., Cowan D., Croft J., Cole M., Hunter C. (2010) Rent Arrears Management Practices in the Housing Association SectorTenants Services Authority http://www.tenantservicesauthority.org/server/show/ConWebDoc.20103

Contact: caroline.hunter@york.ac.uk

—-

dr. T. O. Ireland (University of Niagara, United States of America)

Dr. Ireland has been teaching at Niagara University in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice since 1996 and has been chair of the Department since 2002. Presently, the Criminal Justice Department is one of the largest majors on campus.

Dr. Ireland’s research interests are diverse. For a number of years, he has been affiliated with a longitudinal research project (The Rochester Youth Development Study), which has allowed him to explore the causes and consequences of exposure to family violence. He recently finished work as a co-principle investigator on a National Institute of Drug Abuse grant.

Currently he is a research associate on a Center for Disease Control and Prevention grant working to understand the causes of family violence across generations. He also has an interest in environmental justice, which examines the relationship between measures of concentrated poverty, race and exposure to environment risk. He has a long-standing interest in a specific criminology theory – strain theory – which was the focus of his dissertation. He also has an interest in and around public housing, and how stressors and strains generate crime. He and Dr. Rivera are involved in an evaluation project of a HOPE VI project in the City of Niagara Falls. HOPE VI is a federal program designed to reconceptualize and rebuild public housing. Finally, he was awarded a state grant from the Developmental Disability Planning Council to design and implement disability awareness training for all First Responders in New York State.

Research interests: family violence, public housing, criminology

Selected publications:

  • Ireland, Timothy; Thornberry, Terence & Loeber, Rolf (2006). Residential stability among adolescents in public housing: A risk factor for delinquent and violent behaviour? In John Flint (ed). Housing, Urban Governance and Anti-social Behavior: Perspectives, Policy and Practice.  Bristol,UK: The Policy Press.

Contact: toi@niagara.edu

—-

M. Lahiff  B.A., H.DipRe, PgDip. Criminology (Dublin Institute of Technology, Ireland)

Following my undergraduate degree in Applied Social Studies, I worked, first, in residential youth work and later, with young offenders as the Coordinator of a Garda Youth Diversion Project. Over the past few years I have been awarded a H.Dip in Education (R.E.) and a PgDip in Criminology. More recently, I have been involved in the design and facilitation of introductory programes in Criminology and Psychology for mature Access students in Kildare VEC and Dublin Institute of Technology respectively. I am particularly interested in the perspectives of the people and communities directly affected by the juvenile justice process. My PhD thesis is concerned with Reducing Youth Offending and pays particular attention to the Perspectives of Parents in the Context of the Youth Justice System. Rooted in the phenomenological approach, this research involves the qualitative analysis of data collected using observational and semi-structured interview methods. The aim of this research is to provide a rich and nuanced account of, and from, the central actors involved in supporting young people who are engaging in anti-social behaviour.

More information:

http://www.linkedin.com/pub/maria-lahiff/1b/23b/378

http://www.dit.ie/media/newsdocuments/2011/GRBooklet11_web.pdf

Contact:  lahiff.maria@gmail.com

—-

dr. D. Martin (University of Brighton , UK).

Dr. Denise Martin is senior lecturer at the University of Brighton. She is interested in Police Culture, Performance Management and Managerialism in Policing, Police Leadership and Violence, Crime and Security in Schools

Publications:

Martin, Denise, Chatwin, Caroline and Porteous, David (2007) Risky or at Risk, Young People, Safety and Security Criminal Justice Matters, 68 (1). pp. 27-28. ISSN 0962-7251

Martin, D., Chatwin, C. and Goodman, A. (2007) Risky or at risk? Young people, surveillance and security Criminal Justice Matters, 68 (Summer). pp. 27-28.

Martin, D., Porteous, D., Chatwin, C. and Goodman, A. (2007) Young victims of street crime in an East London borough Community Safety Journal, 6 (3). pp. 29-35.

Hayden, Unknown and Martin, Denise Crime, school and anti-social behaviour Palgrave Macmillan. (In Press)

See http://www.brighton.ac.uk/sass/contact/details.php?uid=dm109

Contact:D.Martin@brighton.ac.uk

—-

dr. G. Martin (University of Sydney, Australia)

Greg Martin completed his degree and doctorate (both in Sociology) at the University of Exeter. Subsequently, he did a PGCE, taught in the Department of Sociology and Social Anthropology at Keele University, was a Research Fellow in the Department of Sociology and SocialPolicy at the University of Leeds, travelled the world, completed a law degree at the University of Western Australia, and worked in legal publishing. Prior to moving to the University of Sydney, Greg was a Lecturer in Criminology at the University of Western Sydney.
Research interests

: Criminal and constitutional law, cultural criminology, political sociology, protest and public order policing, social movements, youth studies.

Selected publications:

–  Martin, G. (2011) ‘Tackling “Anti-social Behaviour” in Britain and New South Wales – A Preliminary Comparative Account’ Current Issues in Criminal Justice 22(3): 379-397.

———-

dr. D. McCarthy (University of Surrey, UK)

Dr Daniel McCarthy is Lecturer in Criminology at the University of Surrey, UK. His research focuses on the role of social control agencies in the collaborative management of anti-social behaviour, with specific reference to early intervention initiatives and preventive controls. This has included publications in the British Journal of Criminology (2010) on the practices of social control agents in the implementation of contractual injunctions such as Anti-Social Behaviour Orders (ASBOs), in Critical Social Policy (2011) on the ways early intervention initiatives and class politics are intertwined in specific case decisions, and in Policing and Society (2012) which analyses the roles of female police officers in the management of anti-social behaviour through ‘soft’ policing practices. A more comprehensive review of the research is due to be published in a book with Palgrave/Macmillan in 2013 entitled ‘Soft’ Policing and Partnership Strategies: The Collaborative Control of Anti-Social Behaviour.
Research interests: anti-social behaviour, policing, ASBOs

Selected publications:

http://bjc.oxfordjournals.org/content/50/5/896.abstract

http://csp.sagepub.com/content/31/4/495.abstract

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10439463.2012.703199

Contact: d.mccarthy@surrey.ac.uk

——-

prof. A. Millie (Edge Hill University, UK)

Andrew Millie was appointed Professor of Criminology at Edge Hill University in September 2011. Born in Clacton-on-Sea in Essex, he studied in Wales at Swansea University and has worked at universities in London, the Midlands and Scotland. Andrew is well known for his work on anti-social behaviour; however, he is also interested in policing, youth justice, criminological theory and philosophical criminology. He has published a number of books including “Securing Respect: Behavioural Expectations and Anti-Social Behaviour in the UK” (2009, The Policy Press), and “Anti-Social Behaviour” (2009, Open University Press), which was runner-up for the British Society of Criminology (BSC) Book Prize. Andrew’s recent work has considered issues of criminalization, aesthetics and values. He is currently working on projects looking at post-austerity policing and at relationships between criminology, architecture and landscape. Andrew’s research has received funding from various sources, including the British Academy, the Home Office, the Police Foundation, Joseph Rowntree Foundation, Nuffield Foundation and the International Council for Canadian Studies. Andrew has held visiting fellowships at the University of Toronto and at Charles Sturt University, Australia. He is on the editorial board of the British Journal of Criminology and is Executive Committee member and Publications Chair of the BSC. Andrew is Editor of the BSC Online journal “Papers from the British Criminology Conference”, the BSC Newsletter, and has been an Editor of the journal “Urban Studies”.

Selected publications:

  • Millie, A. (2009) Anti-Social Behaviour, Maidenhead: Open University Press.
  • Millie, A. (ed.) (2009) Securing Respect: Behavioural Expectations and Anti-Social Behaviour in the UK, Bristol: The Policy Press.
  • Millie, A., Jacobson, J., McDonald, E. and Hough, M. (2005) Anti-Social Behaviour Strategies: Finding a Balance, Bristol: The Policy Press.
  • Millie, A. and Moore, S. (2011) ‘Crime, Anti-social Behaviour and Education: A Critical Review’, in C. Hayden and D. Martin (eds.) Crime, Anti-Social Behaviour and Schools, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Contact: Andrew.Millie@edgehill.ac.uk

—–

prof. H. Pawson (University of New South Wales, Australia)

  • Holds undergraduate (Geography, first class hons) and post-graduate (Social Policy) degrees from Southampton and Bristol Universities
  • Joined Heriot-Watt in 1995; previously worked in local government policy/research roles
  • From July 2011 based at University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
  • Experienced researcher focusing mainly on policy-related topics; well-known in the housing profession
  • Has led many major research projects commissioned by central government departments and national housing agencies in England and Scotland
  • Has published widely in international journals as well as co-authoring two research-based books
  • Managing editor of the highly-rated international journal, Housing Studies
  • Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Housing

Research interests: Housing law and policy; UK anti-social behaviour law

Selected publications:

–  Pawson, H. & McKenzie, C. (2006) Social landlords, anti-social behaviour and countermeasures; in Flint, J. (ed) Housing, Urban Governance and Anti-social Behaviour; Bristol: Policy Press

– Pawson, H., Davidson, E. & Lederle, N. (2007); Housing Associations’ Use of ASB Powers; Sector Study 59; London: Housing Corporation

– Pawson, H., Davidson, E., Sosenko, F., Flint, J., Nixon, J., Casey, R. & Sanderson, D. (2009) Evaluation of Intensive Family Support Projects in Scotland; Edinburgh: Scottish Government

– Flint, J. & Pawson, H. (2009) Social landlords and the regulation of conduct in urban spaces in the UK; Criminology and Criminal Justice Vol: 9(4) pp1–21

———-

Dr. Ranasinghe (University of Ottowa, Canada)

Prashan Ranasinghe is assistant professor at the University of Ottowa.

Research Interests : Law and Society; The Regulation of Public Space; Homelessness; History of Criminology/Criminological Thought

Selected publications:

  • ‘Vagrancy as a Penal Problem: The Logistics of Administering Punishment in Late-Nineteenth-Century Canada’, Journal of Historical Sociology, (Forthcoming)
  • , «Jane Jacobs Framing of Public Disorder and its Relation to the Broken Windows Theory», Theoretical Criminology, 16(1), 2012, 63-84
  • Public Disorder and its Relation to the Community-Civility-Consumption Triad: A Case Study on the Uses and Users of Contemporary Urban Public Space, Urban Studies, 48(9), 2011, 1925-1943
  • Ambivalence towards Law: Business Improvement Associations, Public Disorder and Legal Consciousness, International Journal of Law in Context, 6(4), 2010, 323-342
  • Prashan Ranasinghe, Reconceptualizing Vagrancy and Reconstructing the Vagrant: A Socio-Legal Analysis of Criminal Law Reform in Canada, 1953-1972, Osgoode Hall Law Journal, 48(1), 2010, 55-94
  • Prashan Ranasinghe and Mariana Valverde, Governing Homelessness through Land-use: A Socio-legal Study of the Toronto Shelter Zoning By-law, Canadian Journal of Sociology, 31(3), 2006, 325-349

See http://www.socialsciences.uottawa.ca/crm/professor-profile?id=758

Contact: Prashan.Ranasinghe@uottawa.ca

—-

L. Roberts LLM (Liverpool John Moores University/ University of York, United Kingdom)

After a career lecturing law to built environment undergraduates, Leigh completed training in private practice and qualified as a solicitor in 1997. Post qualification, she worked as an in-house lawyer and in private practice in housing litigation.  Leigh was appointed senior lecturer in May 2004 but is involved with a number of local housing organisations.

Leigh is subject leader on the LPC for Practical Legal Research and joint subject leader on the LPC for Business Law and Practice and Client in the Community.  Leigh is part of the LPC teaching teams for Interviewing, and Drafting.  Leigh is subject leader on the GDL for Legal Research  Leigh is part of the LLB teaching teams for Independent Learning in Law and Social and Legal Studies and Module leader of Law and the Vulnerable Person.

Leigh is member of the North West Housing Law Practitioner Group, Law Society of England and Wales, Liverpool Law Society, Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. 

 

Research interestsAnti-social behaviour, mental disability and housing

Contact: L.E.Roberts@ljmu.ac.uk

———-

A.E. van Rooij LLM (VU University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands)

Mandy van Rooij works as a PhD-researcher and lecturer at the VU University of Amsterdam.

Controlling structural disturbance and nuisance is considered a high priority problem by the Government. Consequently, a number of new public powers have been developed in this context. However, not much is known about the role that is played by semi-public and private actors when they operate in this field. These actors can be active in areas such as social housing, public transportation, education, health care, retail, private security and residents associations. This research involves the interaction between public, semi-public and private actors to fight and prevent disturbance in de public domain. This interaction creates a mix of public law and private law instruments and this research focuses on the legal possibilities and limits in this field. Consideration is given to the fundamental principles of public and private law. Certain of these principles must be taken into account by the actors when they control structural disturbance. The aim is to achieve a balance between de public interests and the individual liberties of citizens.

This research will result in a dissertation. It has started in September 2011 and will be finalized in August 2016. Supervisors are prof. mr. A.E. Schilder and prof. mr. C.E.C. Jansen.

Research interests: Public Order Law; Dutch anti-social behaviour law

Selected publications:

Contact: a.e.van.rooij@vu.nl

—–

prof. dr. A.E. Schilder (VU University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands)

Jon Schilder is professor of constitutional law at the VU University of Amsterdam.

Research interests: Public Order Law; Dutch anti-social behaviour law; Right to protest.

Selected publications:

Contact: a.e.schilder@rechten.vu.nl

—-

prof. dr. P. Squires (University of Brighton, the United Kingdom)

Peter Squires is professor of Criminology & Public Policy.

He began working at the University of Brighton in 1986. Before that he taught sociology and social policy at Roehampton Institute and for the Open University and at Bristol Polytechnic.

He graduated in Sociology & Social Policy from the University of Bristol and his PhD. titled, Studies in the Criminalisation of Poverty, was completed there in 1985.

After experience as a management Committee member of the Brighton Community Law Centre and the Community Health Council he was elected as a Brighton Borough councillor for Regency Ward (1990-1994).

Since the early 1990s he has helped develop the new teaching and research specialism in criminology and criminal justice at SASS. This has attracted many new students and led to the significant growth of the school. The school is now developing a Criminology Masters portfolio.

In the local area he has undertaken a great deal of research and consultancy with, among others, Sussex Police, the East Sussex Fire and Rescue Service and the Youth Justice Board. In 2003 he was co-opted onto the Home Office Firearms Consultative Committee as a result of his work in the field of firearms and crime.

Research interests: Policing and law and order; Firearms and violence, culture and society; Ideological debates and social change; The media, culture and deviance and control; Community safety policy; Young people and social policy;Anti-social behaviour; Crime, globalisation and cultural differences.

Selected publications:

  • Squires, P. (2005) ‘Rougher Justice: Young People and Anti-social Behaviour’, Cullompton, Devon, Willan Publishing (with Dawn Stephen) (220 pages approx)
  • Squires, Peter (2008) ASBO nation: the criminalising of nuisance The Policy Press, Bristol. ISBN 978 1 84742 027 5; 978 1 84742 028 2

See for more publications and downloads: http://www.brighton.ac.uk/sass/contact/details.php?uid=pas1

Contact: P.A.Squires@brighton.ac.uk

——

dr. D. Stephen (University of Brighton, the United Kingdom)

Dr. Dawn Stephen is Assistant Head of School of Applied Social Science of the University of Brighton.

Research interests: marginalised young people’s agency, culture and transitions in late modernity; community Safety policy, especially anti-social behaviour; social justice; student well-being

Selected publications:

See for more publications and downloads: http://www.brighton.ac.uk/sass/contact/details.php?uid=des

Contact: D.E.Stephen@brighton.ac.uk

—–

prof. dr. L. Veny (University of Ghent, Belgium)

Ludo Veny is professor of constitutional law at the University of Ghent. One of his research interest is the municipal administrative penalty notice (Gemeentelijk Administratieve Sanctie) and the tackling of nuisance (openbare overlast).

Research interests: Belgian anti-social behaviour law, public order law; municipal administrative penalty notices (Gemeentelijk Administratieve Sancties)

Selected publications:

  • N. DE VOS en L.M. VENY (eds), Gemeentelijke Administratieve Sancties, Brugge, Vandenbroele, 2005, 285 p.

Contact: Ludo.Veny@UGent.be

—-

prof. dr. D. Wexler (University of Puerto Rico, Puerto Rico/USA)

David Wexler is Professor of Law and Director of the International Network on Therapeutic Jurisprudence, University of Puerto Rico. He is Distinguished Research Professor of Law, Rogers College of Law as well.

See http://www.law.arizona.edu/Faculty/getprofile.cfm?facultyid=91 and http://www.therapeuticjurisprudence.org/

Research interests: Therapeutic jurisprudence; anti-social behaviour; problem-solving justice

Publications:

http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/cf_dev/AbsByAuth.cfm?per_id=199142

Contact: davidBwexler@yahoo.com